Monthly Archives: December 2016

Creative Writing Coach

In January 2014, I re-invented myself as a creative writing coach.  With just four writers in my new Beyond-the-Lamppost Creative Writing group, I wondered whether I was making the right decision.

What was the Right Choice?

Should I continue my freelance work ( I still had enough work to keep me happy with three different companies although writing about milk packaging, trucking and home renovations was not my definition of fulfillment) or should I devote myself to my own novels?

Did I have enough insight into the creative process in order to guide other writers? Yes, upon reflection, I knew I did. From the creative writing classes I myself had taken, I knew I could offer much, much more. Those classes were too big with far too many people all clamoring to have their views heard – but sadly, very few of them had anything of value to add. The leader of these classes is insightful, but given that his classes are so big, is completely unable to provide any detail to any one person’s story or to see the arc of the plot – where it should go and how it should unfold. Besides, providing three long pieces in a 12-week span was not my idea of achieving my goal: finishing my novel and becoming a traditionally published author.

What to do?

Many thanks to those first classes because it did set me on the right road. It taught me to end my chapters on a cliffhanger, and it gave me the camaraderie of other writers. But that’s all it could do for me, and I noticed many others who were similarly stalled. If you’ve been stuck writing the same story for 5 -7 years – there is a problem … and I noticed this among many of the other writers. That’s why I felt there was a need for Beyond-the-Lamppost.

My Solution

  1. Submit 1,500 words each week so that your story moves rapidly forward, and your peers remember your plot since you continue it each week
  2. Small groups of writers at the same level who have the ability to critique and/or the willingness to learn
  3. Major feedback from the coach who looks at the weekly piece with an eye not just on that submission, but with its place in the whole story
  4. Option to brainstorm instead of submitting a piece

My Qualifications

My training in journalism had given me a good eye and the tools of the trade: the ability to write succinctly, and grammatically and to a self-imposed deadline. Plus, I was very good at ledes (the first line in any article – now re-named ‘the hook’ in novels) I had to trade objectivity with creativity and that worked too – I was far more creative than I’d realized. Plus, having done a lot of editing as well, I knew just where and what to cut.

Just do it, I told myself … and I did … and I’ve never been happier. Thank you to my two groups of talented writers (you know who you are) and I look forward to broadening my classes to one more in the New Year.

3 Best Writing Books

Choose one or all of these writing books to gift the Shakespeare in your life.

kingOn Writing by Stephen King

This is my favorite book on writing – strange because I’m not a big fan of King’s mostly because I don’t like horror and find his writing style not very appealing. He is a master of plots though and has a wicked imagination, which I admire. What’s great about On Writing is the advice he gives. It is clear, meaningful and written is plain English. Buy it, you won’t regret it.

The Elements of Style by William Strunk Jr. and E.B. Whitestyle

So many writers today have no idea how to string a sentence together and as for grammar and spelling – well, they seemed to have bypassed that class in grade school. You can’t write a novel the way you text, so if you want to learn the elements of writing – begin with this book.

 

bellPlot & Structure: Techniques and Exercises for Crafting a Plot that Grips Readers from Start to Finish by James Scott Bell

Whew! that’s one heck of a title, but read through that and you’ll get a super idea of how plots work and how to create them. James Scott Bell writes suspense and thrillers (not my favorite genre) but when it comes to teaching someone how to craft a novel – he’s No. 1 in my book.

 

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January Creative Writing Classes

Start the New Year off with a creative writing class. If you are new to writing and want to learn how to turn your idea into a novel, Creative Writing 101 on Tuesday afternoons is the one to choose.

You can come with your own ideas, or tempt your brain with some writing prompts.If you have a manuscript you’ve been working on for some time, and have gotten nowhere with – the Wednesday or Thursday class will be ideal for you. This is a challenging course where you submit 1,500 words each week. It is intended for writers who want to strengthen their manuscripts and move ahead rapidly. Be prepared for lots of hard work but plenty of fun.

Creative Writing Classes

WINTER 2017 – 12-week Writing Classes

imagesCreative Writing 101 – Tuesday afternoons Jan. 10 – March 14  from 12:30 – 3:30 p.m.
Crafting Your Novel – Wednesday afternoons Jan. 11 – March 15  from 12:30 – 3:30 p.m.
Crafting Your Novel – Thursday afternoons Jan. 12 – March 16 from 12:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Location: Unity Church, 3075 Ridgeway Drive, Mississauga
Fee: $160 for 12 sessions – To register, email: beverleyburgessbell@gmail.com