Intro to Novel Writing

This Intro to Novel Writing post is for newbie writers who’d like to take a stab at having the best fun in the world.

Step 1 – Put on Your Thinking Cap

Every successful book starts with a kick-ass idea. Without that, you’ve got nothing. So, how does one come up with that awesome idea?

What best-selling author Stephen King does is to ask the question – what if? He says he then takes two unrelated ideas and sees if he can get them to work. That’s how he came up with the plot of Carrie. Two unrelated ideas – adolescent cruelty and telekinesis. With over 50 published books (most of them best-sellers) his formula apparently works!

You can find good ideas everywhere. Look up unusual and interesting facts, take an actual murder case or an event you’ve read about or seen on television and make it your own. Change the characters and the setting – perhaps even certain elements of the event and throw in some other incidents and voilà – you’ve got the possible foundation for a great story.

Step 2 – Elaborate Your Idea

Now it’s time to do some serious thinking. You don’t want to just copy a story you’ve read somewhere. That would be plagiarism. What you want to do is take the scenario you’ve come up with and figure out who the main characters are (more about this in the next step). Next, it’s time to let your mind wander and wonder:

  • I wonder what would happen to character X if he was an athlete, or an alien, or secretly married to twins.
  • I wonder what would happen if character X spent his/her childhood as a changeling, or his parents were Russian spies, or perhaps he can remember NO childhood. What caused his amnesia?
  • I wonder what would happen if character X was really a fairy or an alien pretending to be a human? Or what if character X had the power to annihilate the world by clicking his fingers – what would happen?

Step 3 – Characters

Novels are populated with people. So you must come up with a main character who the story will be about. For example, J.K. Rowling’s famous series Harry Potter is … about Harry Potter. But Harry doesn’t exist in a vacuum. Harry interacts with his friends Ron and Hermione and with his enemies like Voldemort. He has a family, albeit one that hates him, and interests like playing Quidditch and getting into trouble.

So too, must your characters.

Who are the characters that will people your world? Does your main character have a family? Has she lost her family in a vile and cruel way, or maybe she grew up in foster homes. Give her a background, physical traits and a job. Give her likes and dislikes.

Step 4 – Conflict

Interesting stories are full of struggles. If your hero gets the girl right away – where’s the story and why would anyone care enough to read to the end of the book. The characters in your story need to have a quest. There must be something they hope to achieve and there must be something or someone who is always in the way, preventing them from getting to their goal. The bigger the struggle to overcome, the better the book.

Step 5 – Sub-plots

No character in real life or in a novel lives in a vacuum, pursuing just one thing in life. In reality, we might be accountants who enjoy writing the next great novel at night; we might be a mild-mannered journalist by day and Superman by night. So too, your characters. Give them layers – that’s what a sub-plot means. Perhaps your hero is trying a man for murder, but that’s not all he does. He probably has a love life on the side and perhaps it’s not going well, or maybe his mother has upped and married a man who is younger than him and because of that your hero can’t concentrate on the job he’s got to do. Have fun coming up with sub-scenarios.

Step 6 – Read & Write

Read books in the genre you are writing. Romance writers should be soaking up as much romance as they can. If you’re reading about it, that’s fine. If you’re experiencing it, even better. If you enjoy writing thrillers, read them as well. A good writer is a voracious reader. Learn from the books or soak it up through osmosis.

Now comes the toughest, but most fun, part. SIT DOWN AND BEGIN TO WRITE.

Congratulations & Next Steps

If you’ve followed Steps 1 – 6, you’ve generated a few solid ideas and have come up with a plot line or two. You’ve learned a few techniques and you’re raring to get started. Do it. Start writing. Eventually, you’ll reach a point where you’d like input from others to find out whether your story is actually interesting: are your words making sense? are your characters compelling? do you even have a plot?

Beyond-the-Lamppost Weekly classes can help you.

You can join the Lamppost Writers Weekly Classes held in Oakville, Ontario. There is something for everyone to choose from. Small classes of not more than 8 students mean lots of individual attention to focus on your writing’s strengths and weaknesses.

OR

Sign up for the 12-week Online Creative Writing Classes. Each week you’ll send me 3-5 pages of your novel and each week you’ll receive in-depth feedback on your work to help you grow as a writer. Also expect to receive a weekly handout to help you understand the intricacies of creative writing.

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